Category Archives: Lifestyle

Dating in High School

Abigail Kuhns

     As a kid I had a perception of what I thought high school would be like. The truth is that high school is not like the movies: no one is shoved into lockers, no one breaks into song throughout the school day and not everyone looks like a model after puberty hits. However, the most stereotypical high school experience I could not have predicted is dating. 

     Amongst us there are some who have it all figured out, but most of us have it all wrong. Children of the 21st century are unconsciously beginning to fall into a pattern of habits.

     First, it has become “cool” to show a lack of care and to show nonchalant attitude towards others. Showing care is showing weakness. Way too often, I have found myself or my peers rewriting a text or blatantly not speaking up because it would show we care too much as if that is a bad thing. 

     In middle school health class, they always say how as a teen it will be an emotional rollercoaster. The biggest reason for this is because it is a constant fight with our emotions. Rather than just saying how we truly feel, we hide our emotions to have the upper hand against a friend, boyfriend or girlfriend. 

      No one is willing to take the risk or put them self out there in fear it may not work out. Today, we would rather have love find us than going out and finding love. 

     Second, it has become a misconception that going on a date, such as dinner, all of a sudden means it is a serious relationship with someone. As a result, some of us will not date at all. 

     Instead, we have decided to just be in this stage of “just talking,” or “being a thing” because referring to the concept as dating makes it sound way too serious. Dating has also been conceived as causing drama or being too complicated when in reality the dynamic is up to the people.

      In the past 40 years, the proportion of seniors who report not dating at all increased substantially over this period, from 15 to 49 percent.

      No matter what the situation is, the ‘title’ or ‘label’  has become a defining point for relationships. There are specific time frames as to when it is acceptable and expected for relationship norms such as when to say ‘I love you.’  The label has started to define the norms and boundaries instead of the people.

      Finally, a common area of confusion is intent. If one is dating someone else, it means they are looking at them as a possible husband or wife. This is high school; most relationships will die within the four years. 

     Some will put themselves out there and accept it for what it is: dating. And some will end up together. However, the reality for most of us is dating in high school is not about looking for someone to spend the future with. We are not mature enough yet to even know who we will be for the rest of our lives. 

      At this point in life, dating should be focused on someone with of interest instead of a desire to find “the one.” Looking for someone who makes them smile, someone who keeps them on their toes, someone who brings out something positive in them that they did not know they had or needed.

     No one should feel ashamed for choosing to date or choosing not to. It should be embraced as an experience towards growth. When it comes to an end, and so often it does, the relationship should be left with an insight as to what can be better next time.

     If everyone gave up after the first try, they could easily let an exceptional experience dating has to offer slip through their hands. We should be taking advantage of this time when dating is not expected to lead into marriage to figure ourselves out and learn from experience. 

     Before we know it, we will be walking out of high school, the goal will shift and dating will become serious. Be a high schooler, how care and appreciation, take a chance on someone, build meaningful connections, learn from each other, and most of all, stop making everything so complicated. More often than not, the best relationships and experiences come from something that was least expected. 

      

     

     

 

Therapy Dogs

Amanda Ostrowski
Therapy dogs are used to help those in hospitals, schools, nursing homes, retirement homes, people with learning difficulties, and in stressful and disasters.
There are students here at stow high school that suffer from major anxiety. Since that is what therapy dogs are for students with super high anxiety should be aloud to have one in school.
I do not think that anyone that says they have anxiety should have a therapy dog, there should be guidelines. Whether it is taking a test, having a doctors or psychiatrist note that says it would help them and that they are not faking it.
For kids to have a therapy dog there are alot of good reasons to have one but there are also a lot of bad reasons to have one.
“ I like the idea of therapy dogs and I feel they can really help people out, but I am afraid of dogs,” said Senior Madison Critchlow.
Critchlow sees both sides of views, she understands why people need therapy dogs, but she also knows that it will distract her if the dogs are there because she is afraid of them.
Though to prevent this from happening they could have the dogs maybe just be used when the kids with anxiety are taking a test or maybe even presenting but they would do it in a room where no one is afraid of dogs.
“ Dogs are very cute so they might distract the kids from doing their work,” said Sophomore Kayla Mchale.
Many students would get very distracted from having the dog there, but I think after a while they would just get used to having the dog there just like anything else.
Mchale does think that people should have therapy dogs she just pointed out the fact that students will probably get distracted.
“ I think that they should have therapy dogs at school because it would help them focus better and other students around would probably be more focused after they get used to them,” said Freshman Olivia Evans.
Evans and many more believe that we should be aloud to have therapy dogs for the students who really need it.
Therapy dogs would be a good addition to stow high school not only would it help kids but it might convince other schools just to do the same.
There are many reasons that the therapy dogs should not be at the school: people are allergic, expensive, requires time, and care. There are so many preventions to help many of these problems. I think that what they do for kids, makes up for any of the doubts, or bad reasons for it.

The Vegan Experience

Abby Kuhns
Many people in 2019 chose to commit to live a vegan lifestyle. These people, in other words, choose not to eat or use any products from animals such as fur, milk, eggs or meat.
As a part of my news years resolution I decided to try and live vegan for two weeks. I ate a fair share of salads and a bunch of fruits during this time.
The most difficult part was eating simple items such as a granola bar because it contained honey. I did have the opportunity to try zucchini pasta which I would not normally eat.
The absolute best food item I tried was bagel “Halo Top” ice cream. It tasted the exact same at typical ice cream but with coconut milk instead of regular milk, and it was quite delicious.
A large amount of vegan options I tried is very unique to say the least; however, I was not a huge fan of all of it. It was hard trying to eat out because even items like salad I would have to take off egg, meat, cheese and change the dressing to make sure it had no animal products.
I give a lot of credit to the people who can commit to living a vegan lifestyle because it was a challenging process for me and I had many times where I just wanted to reach for that cookie with butter, milk and eggs.
In my opinion, I would not recommend completely changing one’s lifestyle to vegan if one has lived life eating and using animal products.
The transition is difficult and most definitely takes time to become accustomed to. I think if I would have progressed from omnivore to vegetarian to pescatarian to vegan I would have done much better with the food options I had.

Making the most of the zzz’s

By Suzie Lee

In the 21st century, people’s lives have become so busy they sacrifice at least one thing to maintain their routines–sleep.

    Among the college students, there is a popular myth called “The 2 Out of 3 Myth”: People have to choose two of the three–getting enough sleep, having a social life, or getting good grades because they will never have time for all three.

    Most people decide to choose grades and social life over getting a good sleep; sleep is underrated by many people even though it is proved as an important health factor.

    Celebrating its annual Sleep Awareness Week, March 11 to 17, 2018, the National Sleep Foundation is  highlighting the theme of “Begin with Sleep,” which assures the importance of good sleep health for individuals to best achieve their life goals.

    “Begin with Sleep” has the meaning of each day starts out by having a great sleep when others mostly think sleeping as the last routine of the day.

    For teenagers, the recommended sleep hour by The National Sleep Foundation is eight to ten hours, and they strongly suggest to sleep no less than seven hours.

    Adults need at least seven hours or more to promote optimal health and well-being; however, many adults are not sleeping the recommended time.

     According to news.gallup.com, 59% of the adult get seven or more hours of sleep at night but 40% get less than seven hours of sleep.

    The National Sleep Foundation suggests four ways such as to set up a sleeping schedule: no tech in the bedroom, relax before bedtime and control the room temperature.

    In 2016’s National Sleep Awareness Week, the foundation gave each daily instructions for a better sleep.

    On the first day, the foundation asks to start the week by making time for the sleep the mind and body needs.

   On the day second, leaving a couple hours between eating and going to bed is suggested because it will help the body to reap the maximum benefits of a good night’s sleep.

    On the third day, any electronic devices should be turned off and away to bed because blue light from screen can disrupt circadian rhythm and affect the ability of sleep.

    The foundation also says keeping the bedroom dark and painting cool toned colors on the walls will help for better sleep on the fourth day.

     Moreover, creating a bedtime ritual such as taking deep breaths, as well as stretching and other relaxing exercises can help to wind down and set the mind ready for sleep.

    On the sixth day, the foundation hints that keeping a piece of paper next to the bed and writing down any concerns of the day before going into sleep can also be beneficial for mind control and a stress-free sleep.

    Lastly, the week wraps up by focusing on how much sleep is important for everything. The foundation also uses the last day as a reminder to account for daylight savings time, which occurs this Saturday evening.

     Providing valuable information about the benefits of optimal sleep and how sleep affects health, well being and safety is the foundation’s ultimate goal during this week.